Corporation and LLC

Monday, January 15, 2018

Crowdfunding; Multiple Investors and Commercial Real Estate Lease Issues


The concept of investing using an internet crowdfunding model is a fairly recent development and commercial leases often are behind the curve.  A business owner planning to raise capital through an online equity crowdfunding platform would be prudent to pay close attention to restrictions that are often contained in the assignment provision of its commercial lease agreement.  Generally, clauses governing a tenant’s right to assign or sublet are some of the most detailed, complex and extensively negotiated provisions of a commercial lease, partly due to the fact that a tenant’s covenant that it will not assign its lease cannot be implied.  Landlords who want to maintain control over the identity of their commercial tenant, are therefore expected to include within the lease explicit language restricting those types of transfers which cannot be performed without first obtaining landlord’s written consent. Additionally, because New York courts disfavor assignment prohibitions, viewing them as a restraint on alienation, clauses intended to restrict lease transfers must be clear and precise in order to pass judicial scrutiny.
Read more . . .


Sunday, January 14, 2018

Crowdfunding; Multiple Investors and New York State Liquor Authority Disclosure Issues


Crowdfunding is becoming an increasingly popular way for business owners to gain the financial backing they need to turn their concepts into realities. In recent years, websites like kickstarter.com have helped thousands of entrepreneurs obtain access to the funds they needed to get their projects off the ground. With the internet age upon us, the ability to reach people, and beg them for a few dollars, is easier than ever. However, would-be restaurateurs have not been as successful as other small business owners seeking financial backing in these arenas.
Read more . . .


Thursday, August 11, 2016

Free Seminars: Legal Considerations when opening a bar or restaurant. Restaurant Management Boot Camp 2.0

When:   

Downtown Location:  September 13, 2016 from 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.
Uptown Location:  September 28, 2016 from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.

Where:  

Downtown Location: 79 John St., 2nd Fl, New York, NY 10038
Uptown Location:  361 West 125th St., 2nd Fl, New York, NY 10027

Seminar Description:  An insider look at tips, tricks, and best practices to start your first restaurant in NYC, presented by Restaurant Attorney James D. DiPasquale.  To start and run a successful restaurant you must understand many different legal considerations which make operating in New York City, particularly unique. Whether you are a new or existing restaurant owner, this special follow-up to the Restaurant Management Boot Camp class will help you gain a deeper understanding of all of the basic requirements to get your business up and running.

-Forming a Corporation or Limited Liability Company (pros/cons of each)

-Partnership Considerations (The legalities of dealing with your business partners and investors)

-Finding  your restaurant space (Buying an existing restaurant vs. straight lease)

-Negotiating your Restaurant’s lease

-Applying for a Liquor License

-General discussion on permits needed (food service/cabaret/sidewalk café, etc.)

To Register:

For the Downtown seminar:  click HERE or paste the following link into your web browser: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/restaurant-management-bootcamp-20-lower-manhattan-91316-registration-27080444338

For the Uptown seminar, click HERE or paste the following link into your web browser: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/restaurant-management-bootcamp-20-upper-manhattan-92816-registration-26354368626?aff=ebapi


Read more . . .


Friday, July 10, 2015

Obama Care - Are Restaurants Now Required to Provide and Pay for Their Employees’ Health Insurance?

I have been getting many calls from clients asking whether their restaurant (or restaurant group) needs to provide (and pay for) health insurance for their employees.  Unfortunately, the answer is not a simple one.

Beginning this year, companies with 50 full-time equivalent employees (“FTE”) must provide health insurance to at-least 70% of their employees.  In 2016, at-least 95% of all employees must be covered starting in 2016.  If your initial reaction was “I don’t have 50 full-time employees” don’t get too comfortable just yet.  Lets look at the facts:



Read more . . .


Tuesday, August 26, 2014

Seminar Reminder: Restaurant Management Bootcamp 2.0 - Legal Considerations when Opening a Bar or Restaurant

This Thursday August 28, 2014 from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. I’ll be giving a seminar in the Restaurant Management Bootcamp 2.0 Series that is hosted by NYC Small Business Solutions.  The Course Description is copied below:

Restaurant Management Bootcamp 2.0: Legal Considerations when Opening a Bar or Restaurant
An insider look at tips, tricks, and best practices to start your first restaurant in NYC, presented by Restaurant Attorney James D. DiPasquale.  To start and run a successful restaurant you must understand many different legal considerations which make operating in New York City, particularly unique.  Whether you are a new or existing restaurant owner, this special follow-up to the Restaurant Management Bootcamp class will help you gain a deeper understanding of all of the basic requirements to get your business up and running.



Read more . . .


Thursday, November 21, 2013

New SEC Proposal Allows Restaurant Owners to Solicit Investors Through Crowdfunding

Crowdfunding is becoming an increasingly popular way for business owners to gain the financial backing they need to turn their concepts into realities. In recent years, websites like www.kickstarter.com have helped thousands of entrepreneurs obtain access to the funds they needed to get their projects off the ground. With the internet age upon us, the ability to reach people (and beg them for a few dollars) is easier than ever. However, would-be restaurateurs have not been as successful as other small business owners seeking financial backing in these arenas. Unlike other business owners, restaurant owners often need significant sums of money to open their doors. A donation of $10 in exchange for a coupon or a tee-shirt is not typically going to raise the amount of capital needed for a restaurant. But what if you, as a restaurant owner, could solicit true investors in exchange for a piece of your company?


Read more . . .


Friday, September 20, 2013

Seminar: Restaurant Management Bootcamp 2.0 - Legal Considerations

On Monday, September 23, 2013 from 3:00 to 5:00 p.m., I’ll be teaching the Restaurant Management Bootcamp 2.0 Series which is hosted by NYC Small Business Solutions.  The Course Description is copied below:

Restaurant Management Bootcamp 2.0: Legal Considerations of Opening a Bar or Restaurant in NYC.

An insider look at tips, tricks, and best practices to start your first restaurant in NYC, presented by Restaurant Attorney James D. DiPasquale.  To start and run a successful restaurant you must understand many different legal considerations which make operating in New York City, particularly unique.  Whether you are a new or existing restaurant owner, this special follow-up to the Restaurant Management Bootcamp class will help you gain a deeper understanding of all of the basic requirements to get your business up and running.


Read more . . .


Monday, June 24, 2013

Corporation vs. Limited Liability Company: Which provides better liability protection for Restaurant Owners.

Business owners form legal entities such as corporations and limited liability companies in order to protect themselves from personal liability. Before you choose which type of business entity is best for you and your company, consider the different types of protections offered by each of the business forms.

Corporations

New York does not allow corporate shareholders to be completely shielded from liability for their corporate debts. New York is the only state in the country that holds a corporation’s top ten shareholders personally liable for the unpaid wages of the corporation. Section 630(a) of the New York Business Corporation Law states, in relevant part:

“The ten largest shareholders …shall jointly and severally be personally liable for all debts, wages, or salaries due and owing to any of its laborers, servants or employees other than contractors, for services performed by them for such corporation.”


Read more . . .


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